The Auntie Anne’s Christmas (Card) Story

Thank you again to Auntie Anne’s, not only for providing buttons and stickers for future card-making (and a free pretzel!) but also for being so supportive of the work I have done this holiday season. Below is the “story,” if you will, of how the Auntie Anne’s Christmas card (below) came to be. A big thank you to Twitter for being the forum that provided this opportunity. So far this holiday season, I have received a free Auntie Anne’s pretzel and other goodies, $10 in #TweetTidings from Target to use on Target.com, as well as compliments from the online fashion community kaboodle.com – all thanks to Twitter! Perhaps my New Year’s resolution should be to refine my use of Twitter, to maximize the benefits of social networking and make it more than a place where I vent the things I can’t say on facebook.

How do you make the most of social networking sites? What benefits have you received from your use of Twitter, Facebook, etc.? Leave your answer in the comment box below!

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Gift Tag Collection (Christmas)

This year, I decided to make Christmas cards for my friends and coworkers. I have made cards in the past for general note-sending, so I have a collection of card stock and pages ripped from magazines, IKEA catalogs, and old textbooks from the ’80s. It was a creative, personal, and cost-effective way to send holiday greetings. Auntie Anne’s thought it was a great idea when I tweeted about it, so they are sending me pretzel buttons and stickers for future card-making!

In this collection, I put to good use all the area rug advertisements cut out from Architectural Digest magazine.

Inside: May the greatest gift you receive this Christmas be the peace, love, and joy of Jesus Christ.

Click thumbnail to enlarge image.

Ornament Collection (Christmas)

This year, I decided to make Christmas cards for my friends and coworkers. I have made cards in the past for general note-sending, so I have a collection of card stock and pages ripped from magazines, IKEA catalogs, and old textbooks from the ’80s. It was a creative, personal, and cost-effective way to send holiday greetings. Auntie Anne’s thought it was a great idea when I tweeted about it, so they are sending me pretzel buttons and stickers for future card-making!

Click thumbnail to enlarge image.

Cut-Outs Collection (Christmas)

This year, I decided to make Christmas cards for my friends and coworkers. I have made cards in the past for general note-sending, so I have a collection of card stock and pages ripped from magazines, IKEA catalogs, and old textbooks from the ’80s. It was a creative, personal, and cost-effective way to send holiday greetings. Auntie Anne’s thought it was a great idea when I tweeted about it, so they are sending me pretzel buttons and stickers for future card-making!

The cards in this collection are for my co-workers. There are about 20 of us in the office, and this was the best way to whip out a bunch of cards (2 at a time!) that still look nice. I had dove, tree, and holly shapes. I also made a few cards that were red and green with lights (I think the image was from an old electronics or science textbook).

Click thumbnail to enlarge image.

Tree Collection (Christmas)

This year, I decided to make Christmas cards for my friends and coworkers. I have made cards in the past for general note-sending, so I have a collection of card stock and pages ripped from magazines, IKEA catalogs, and old textbooks from the ’80s. It was a creative, personal, and cost-effective way to send holiday greetings. Auntie Anne’s thought it was a great idea when I tweeted about it, so they are sending me pretzel buttons and stickers for future card-making!

This collection features variations on the classic symbol of the holiday season: the evergreen tree. It can be implied by a simple triangle or something more stylized and is transformed into a Christmas tree with the addition of a star.

Click thumbnail to enlarge image.